After COVID?

July 12, 2022 at 10:00 pm | Posted in England walks, Gloucestershire walks, Worcestershire walks | Leave a comment
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‘Time Flies’ I’ve said it before, and to be honest it’s a kind of excuse for not having done something, but in the last five years quite a lot has happened. My previous blog(s) mention knee problems and Lo , they got worse, and after two arthroscopies I ended up having a total knee replacement in 2017. The op went very well, but unlike the previous ones, I decided to take the physio requirements rather more seriously, so I was up and walking moderate! distances in less than two months. I have been keeping a log of all my walks for the last couple of decades and had been regularly walking over a Thousand miles a year but NOT after the knee replacement and that year I was down to just over five hundred. It has increased a bit since then but I doubt whether I shall ever get back to four figures, but the good news is that I am still walking on a regular basis, although not with the LDWA whose walks are mostly too long and too fast for me. The good news is that I have joined a new walking group lead by an interesting character, Bruno, who has a rolling programme of walks, mainly in the Cotswolds and every Tuesday, alternating between long and shorter distances.

Who ever?, wants to write about COVID, but like most keen walkers, I have managed to get out and about with quite a degree of success. During the first lockdown, I managed to hear that the government had decreed you could drive out to your place of exercise so long as your exercise was longer than the drive. So I was able to drive out to the village of Andoversford, which is almost a gateway to The Cotswolds and sort out lots of different lengthy walks. On an early walk, I arrived at the remote village of Hawling , only to find signs saying that the village was closed to walkers. Crazy, but I did later learn that there had been a fatality involved locally. The downside of the pandemic is that most walking clubs, mostly plan their walks some way ahead, and COVID and the early restrictions on group numbers, meant that most people were just sorting out their own little group walks, which they soon got used to. The result of this is that clubs are now offering their members the opportunity to do this, within the group through online contact, which is called Meet Up. This Luddite has never managed to get on the site but then I have enough walking anyway.

My other great interest- Woodland- has also not been much affected. In the early days, when driving the ninety miles or so down to Somerset, I made sure I was in my working clothes and had a spade and tools in the back of the car in case I got stopped, but I never did. However, I did find looking after both woods rather too arduous, especially since most of my time was being spent in the lower wood, where we have our commodious cabin, now with a woodburning stove, added a couple of years back, so last year we decided to part with the top wood and put it on the market. It sold quite quickly to a local couple who wanted to have more space for exercising and training their sporting dog. Unfortunately the sale coincided with the large upturn in property prices but we were happy with the result at the time, and it’s no good looking back!

And now for something rather different! That you may have already spotted on the new menu added to this – PILGRIMAGE WALKS. In my advanced years, I have not gone all religious but prefer to adopt an old adage ‘Curiosity does, no less than devotion, pilgrims make’. This came about through a very old friend of mine who is The Chair for the parochial council of two local churches in North Gloucestershire. One of them is at the rather uninspiring village of Stoke Orchard which is between Cheltenham and Tewkesbury. The clue is in the name of the church, which is dedicated to St James. In the 1950’s and 60’s amazing wall paintings were uncovered under centuries of whitewash, which show St James’s travels to Compestella in Northern Spain and where his relics lie. Outside the porch to the church are quite a few Votive signs which had been inscribed by pilgrims passing through or maybe starting a pilgrimage from the village. So, my friend Roger, pointed them out to me and said’ You’re a long distance walker and you must know nearly every track and footpath in the county, so where do you reckon the pilgrims came from and where were they going?

There is certainly a burgeoning interest in Pilgrimages, and the annual numbers making their way to Compestella, on any of ten or more different routes through France and Spain, now exceeds the numbers from medieval days. Pilgrims arriving at Compestella can acquire a certificate or scroll to show that they have walked at least a hundred km past official way stations and part of the minimum distance covered can also include starting from England.

In our ‘little’ island we have nearly a thousand delineated walking trails and there are about a hundred that are dedicated to a Saint or have a religious or Pilgrimage emphasis. There is definitely quite a strong Pilgrimage history in North Gloucestershire but very few trails. So, ever the enthusiast, yours truly, is now finding links between the local places that pilgrims are known to have travelled.

We, that is Roger Grimshaw and myself, are starting with a circular Pilgrimage trail around Tewkesbury taking in Tewkesbury Abbey, Stoke Orchard, and Deerhurst. More details are on our new Pilgrimage page and this circular trail has just been opened. We have also produced a colour leaflet which is available from the churches and Abbey on route. You can also download it here.

My Pilgrimage interest was further increased when I heard from a lady about a remote church in Worcestershire that had connections. This was just outside the village of Pirton, which is quite close to the NT estate of Croome Park. I looked it up on the relevant OS map and found that it lay on an almost straight line of footpaths, bridle ways and minor roads between Worcester and Tewkesbury and may therefore have been on route for pilgrims between these two major places of worship.

As a long term project, I am now looking at a possible modern pilgrimage route that will start at Worcester Cathedral and then proceed south east linking up many well known places with pilgrimage background to finish up down on the south coast at either Southampton or Portsmouth. My unofficial idea for a title would be ‘A Way to Wessex’

From The Wyche Way to my beloved Blackdown Hills

November 10, 2015 at 9:27 pm | Posted in Gloucestershire walks, Herefordshire walks, Shropshire walks, Worcestershire walks | Leave a comment
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Time flies when you are busy and I’m afraid it was way back in 2013 since my last proper blog. To be fair I have posted news of two new books, The Wyche Way and Striding Around Ross in the meanwhile. It’s been an eventful time but regrettably not all good news in that in 2014 my right knee started to pain me, in sympathy with the left knee, on which I had keyhole surgery in 2010. The same surgeon did tell me that no two knees are the same and of course he was proved right, when after the op, the right knee was still not up to any of my longer (LDWA) walks.

Guy Vowles Dumbleton war memorial

Resting on the good knee at Dumbleton war memorial

I still had quite a lot of work to do on The Wyche Way but fortunately this was organized, in reasonable stages, and I was able to do my final recess, and also the waymarking, without too much problem. We were originally hoping to open The Wyche Way in the Spring of this year to coincide with The Malvern Walking Festival but not only were we not quite ready but Kington Walkers also said that they would like to make it the focal point of their festival in September.

For a small little unsung town Kington has a great deal of enthusiasm for walking and they really did us proud. They organized Kate Ashbrook, who is The President of The Ramblers, to officially open the trail and all the local newspapers carried advance notice of the opening. The weather was fine on the day and there was a crowd of over a hundred milling around the Market Place. Speeches were made by the lady Mayor of Kington, Kate Ashbrook, and I managed a few words as well. I led the walking party off on the first stage followed by 60 local schoolchildren who were just doing the first couple of miles. Nearly at the end of this stage, just before Weobley, is a fine old timbered house called The Ley, which has some Elizabethan origins. I received an email from the owners about a month before the walk saying that they had heard of this inaugural walk and would the party appreciate some tea and cakes, which certainly made a very nice finish to the day.

Broadway Tower - one of the impressive monuments you can see on The Wyche Way

Broadway Tower – one of the impressive monuments you can see on The Wyche Way

The book has been very well received and we have got copies into over ten shops and tourist information centres along the route (you can also buy it here too!). We have received quite a lot of interest from walking groups who are making plans to include it in their programmes for next year. It has also been adopted by a new Worcestershire walking holiday company Black Pear Walking Tours, so the future for the trail looks bright.

I mentioned in an earlier blog that I had been able to get back to my timber trade roots by purchasing a small piece of woodland in the Blackdown Hills. I had an unofficial option at the time to also purchase another adjoining piece which I did in 2014. I have named them Upper and Lower Harding Woods, after an old Somerset family, whom my family married into in the mid 1800’s. The lower wood does not have so many quality trees but does enjoy great views across to the The Quantock Hills in the north. We have had to do quite a lot of work to establish a new vehicular entrance but there is a short footpath that crosses this wood so we have widened it and provided a stone surface, which was rather fitting, in that I was therefore able to improve a footpath, rather than being critical of the condition, as I have often done on walks in the past. We have also cleared quite a few of the obiquitous birch trees to further improve the views and where I intend to put up a rather larger shed (could be a lodge) in the Spring of next year so that even if I cannot walk quite so much as I might like, I can easily travel down the motorway, and seek solace in my woods.

Get your signed copy of The Wyche Way now

September 16, 2015 at 10:19 pm | Posted in England walks, Herefordshire walks, Worcestershire walks | Leave a comment
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I’m delighted to announce that The Wyche Way book is now available to buy for £8.95 (P&P included in the price).

The book is 80 pages long. It’s spiral bound and printed in landscape format to enable easy use whilst walking the trail. It’s packed with full colour maps, photos and illustrations of accommodation and other facilities along the route.

Guy.

New long distance path The Wyche Way will open in September 2015

March 24, 2015 at 8:47 pm | Posted in England walks, Herefordshire walks, Worcestershire walks | 1 Comment
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The Wyche Way is a new long distance path that links two national trails – The Offa’s Dyke Path and The Cotswold Way. It was opened in September 2015.

The Wyche Way

Note from Guy: The Wyche Way is now open and the book is available for sale. Read more here.

The 79 mile trail commences from Kington in Herefordshire (close to the Welsh border) and crosses superb countryside, including the spectacular Malvern Hills, to meet The Cotswold Way at Broadway Tower.

The trail is the brainchild of Guy Vowles, who is not only a very experienced long distance walker, but also the instigator of two other long distance trails, The Palladian Way and The Ross Round.

Guy first heard of the name from a fellow member of The Cheltenham Rambling Club, who had walked much of the same route in a number of circular walks at the end of the 1970’s. The idea had lain dormant since that time but Guy immediately saw the potential for a great new linear trail.

The name is best known from an old ‘Saltway’ crossing of the Malvern Hills known as The Wyche Cutting,but there is also the connotation of Which Way (to go) and there is also an area in the original settlement of Kington close to the church known as the Wych where one can find several buildings bearing the name.

Guy has been greatly assisted by Jim Mason, who is a councillor in Winchcombe, near to the end of the trail. Jim has been much involved in the new Walkers are Welcome initiative (WAW) which is so strong in Winchcombe, and many other towns and villages throughout Britain.

Coincidently Kington is also a WAW town and will now have seven long distance trails passing through this small but atmospheric town. The lovely spa town of Malvern is likewise a stronghold for walkers, and is an ideal halfway point on the trail with all possible services available.

There will be an official opening of the trail on Friday 18th September as part of the Kington Walking Festival. Please contact Guy at guyvowles@talktalk.net if you would like to attend or find out more.

More details of the trail are available at www.guysrambles.co.uk. An affordable guide book of The Wyche Way will be be on sale on the same site from September 2015. Please let Guy know if you would like to pre-order.

Striding Around Ross is now on sale!

March 22, 2013 at 10:02 pm | Posted in Herefordshire walks | Leave a comment
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I’m thrilled to announce that my new book Striding Around Ross is now available for sale. To get one of the first signed copies please go right now to The Ross Round walk page.

Striding Around Ross by Guy Vowles

 

Striding Around Ross

Those of you who know me or are well travelled Herefordshire walkers might have heard of the Ross Round. Well, I have know added an extra loop to create the Ultimate Ross Round, a 26 mile walk around the beautiful Ross on Wye area.

A comprehensive illustrated guide to the book has now been published and is called Striding Around Ross. The book will be officially launched on March 27th at Rossiter Books in Ross on Wye and is now available for sale here at only £4.99 with free P&P.

Buy Striding Around Ross Now

Striding Around Ross £4.99



Although the title is different to my initial Ross Round, Striding Around Ross still includes the original Ross Round (ORR) but it now also has an extra optional loop that makes the new ultimate Ross Round (URR) a marathon distance. There is also a new shorter loop called The Loughpool Loop and this together, with the other additions, mean that there is now around (excuse the pun!) 50 miles of walking described in the new book.

The book is in full colour with detailed maps and many photographs.At 56 pages it is nearly double the size of the previous Ross Round book but will still sell at only £4.99 with free P&P.

New Year – New Walks – And a New Direction?

January 31, 2013 at 3:41 pm | Posted in Devon Walks, Gloucestershire walks, Herefordshire walks, Pub walks, Worcestershire walks | 1 Comment
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Tasting at Broome Farm

Tasting at Broome FarmStriding around Ross

As I mentioned in a previous blog, I had sold out of my Ross Round walking book and have decided to republish it but in a larger format. I approached several publishers without any success but one of them gave me some good advice; ”Where is your new market?” and ”Will the old customers buy another issue which sounds the same”. So, I have renamed it ‘Striding around Ross’ and there are now five interconnecting walks totalling over 50 miles and that includes The Ultimate Ross Round (URR) which is a conglomerate of the Original Ross Round (ORR) plus an extension over May Hill, which makes it up to a marathon distance, and which I still have (forlorn!) hopes of making a route for a major challenge walk.

The previous Ross Round book was self-published and I was resigned to repeating this but then discovered my previous printers were no longer in business. However I then discovered, that the Winchcombe Way walking book had been published digitally and got in touch with local printers who have done a really great job on my book with the advantage that the digital process allows the whole format to be viewed almost as one proceeds.

Fox trap on Aran Mountains

Fox trap on Aran Mountains

The Wyche Way

I have also been busy walking over The Wyche Way, which I have mentioned previously, and which is to be walked by Cheltenham Rambling Club over 6 easy stages later this year. I have been accompanied on the walkovers by Jim Mason, and as ever, Anne Ochala.  Jim has been particularly keen since he is involved with The Walkers are Welcome initiative in Winchcombe and we have discovered that Kington also belongs as well as Bromyard which is close to the route. We have met up with several of the committee members in Kington and have recently learnt that there may be a new walking centre for Herefordshire, hopefully to be established in Kington, so that apart from The Offa’s Dyke path, and the new Arrow Way, they are also interested in promoting The Wyche Way.

Kington is a really rustic little market town, and the first three stages of The Wyche Way pass through rather typical and flat Herefordshire countryside. However,  just when you think it may get a bit boring, you discover an unknown Roman road, a new timber frame house being built out of plantation timbers (as shown on Countryfile) and all sorts of other unexpected gems so that it has been far from boring. During stage two we caught glimpses of the Malvern hills in the distance ahead and at our lunchtime stop on Stage 4, which is as far as we have got so far, we enjoyed a very good break in The Wyche Inn, just below the main ridge of The Malvern’s, which was typical of Herefordshire, having no frills, but offering plain good value.

 Guys Wood!

The last bit of really interesting news is that at long last, I have hopefully acquired a piece of woodland, and what is more, in a really interesting and good walking area, The Blackdown Hills. For those of you who do not know, the background to this is that when we sold our business, nearly twenty years ago, my friend Brian Wright said “why don’t you invest in some woodland. Your family have been in the timber trade for three generations so put something back in?”  I guess at the time, I still had my business hat in place, so we ended up buying another property in Cheltenham where we initially ran a gallery, but which, was later leased out. We sold the property in 2010 and my mind went back to Brian’s original suggestion. The best woodland in the country is mostly part of an estate or a farm and small parcels are not only hard to acquire but relatively expensive with prices rising steadily over the last decade.

Guy in the wood

Guy in the wood

During the last two years I have probably looked at about twenty pieces of woodland. One of the very first which I unsuccessfully tendered for, was the aptly named Walkers Coppice. Fifteen acres of really superb woodland with many prime oaks, situated neat Woodstock and owned along with seven other much larger lots by The Duchy of Cornwell. Actually the position was not the best, being in rather too well populated countryside and rather too close to London. The vendors accepted an offer for the whole estate which made my bid (second best anyway) worthless.

So, where are The Blackdown Hills? It is an unfortunate fact that many people only know where they are by a motorway, so in this case it is necessary to head south on the M5 and then just past Taunton one can see a striking monument up on the wooded hills to the left. This is the Wellington Monument, built to commemorate the famous general, which is situated on the western edge of The Blackdown Hills. This AONB (area of outstanding natural beauty) is not that large and stretches ten miles in a south easterly direction down to the attractive town of Honiton, previously famous as a centre for lace making.

The supposed mantra for a lot of property purchases is position-position etc. I was always looking to get away from it (Gloucestershire) a bit but The Blackdowns are an easy one and a half hours driving, and only just over another half hour to the coast and sea. The aforementioned Brian at Lyme Regis is also less than half an hour way and should be able to help administer any work on the woodland. The woodland is only eight acres and all walkable. (unlike some other jungles I have inspected).

The Blackdown Hills are quite sparsely populated but there are a few interesting villages and apart from the nearby AONB office there is also an East Devon and Blackdown Hills Woodland Association which I plan to join and which offers all sorts of advice.

You may therefore see a little change in direction during the next year from your scribe but whatever, you should still be receiving more news of walks, pubs, and now woodland!

Walks around Abergavenny & Brecon, Wales

September 11, 2012 at 7:59 am | Posted in Pub walks, Wales walks | Leave a comment
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A Diamond Walk

I recently led my first ever walk for The Brecon Beacons Park Society and chose a favourite walk around and over the mountain Blorenge which lies opposite Abergavenny on the south side of the A40 road. My route in the morning circumvented the mountain’s lower slopes before arriving at one of my all time favourite pubs The Goose and Cuckoo at Upper Llanover. In the afternoon we returned over open moorland and just near the prominant radio masts and before ascending Blorenge I stopped to visit the famous Foxhunter Grave.

Foxhunter Grave on Blorenge Mountain South Wales

Foxhunter Grave on Blorenge Mountain South Wales

This was the all conquering horse owned by local horseman Sir Harry Llewellyn who lived nearby. He was part of the UK showjumping  team that won Gold at the 1952 Helsinki Games. The following day, sitting at home, I had the great pleasure of seeing Team GB win the same event in London 60 years on.

Walking back in time

A few weeks later I was on a CRC Cheltenham Rambling Club walk which started at Llangynider which is on The Mon and Brec canal between Abergavenny and Brecon.

Cheltenham Rambling Club on Tor Y Foel Black Mountains

Cheltenham Rambling Club on Tor Y Foel Black Mountains

We initially climbed up the attractive little! peak of Tor-y-Foel (550m) but then our route joined the old Brynore Tramway. This was built in 1815 and the horse drawn trams bought limestone down from quarries high on the hills to the canal for trans shipment down to Newport and the industrial valleys of South Wales.

Cheltenham Rambling Club on Brynore Tramway Black Mountains.

Cheltenham Rambling Club on Brynore Tramway Black Mountains.

It was in use for about a hundred years until motor transport proved more economical. We late visited the Chartist Cave on the remote moorland which was used during the uprisings of the late 1830’s to store weapons and munitions for the cause. On a lighter note we stopped at The Red Lion Pub in Llangynidr for tea after the walk but could have had a Pint of their own beer named Canal Water!

 

Guy Rambles on…from Nerja to Exmoor

April 15, 2012 at 7:40 pm | Posted in Devon Walks, Wales walks, Worcestershire walks | Leave a comment
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Guy Rambles on…from Nerja to Exmoor…and a little bit of bridge restoration on the side.

I guess that blogs are supposed to be rather instant but since I am being badgered by my webmaster to put something, well anything into print,  I have decided to follow on from my last walking blog.

2011 didn’t get off to a good start when, whilst out on a really short local walk with L, my cartilage, which I had been nursing for the previous year, went again. This was just turning to get into the car! so I decided to “bite the bullet” and have the operation. Helped by a large cheque, this was soon accomplished, but the specialist said after the op “you’ve got an awful lot of wear on that knee!”
I was back walking within a couple of weeks and back up to reasonable distances within a couple of months. When people ask me how it is, I say about 80% from perfect, and I now use a walking pole for any serious hill walking.

The big worry for walking at the time was the necessity of waymarking 125 miles of The Palladian Way with the book due out at Easter time. However the delivery from China, where it was printed, was understandably late, although the finished product was just great and has been very well received. I did most of the waymarking with my old friend Ken Thomas, from Chester, who managed to find a relative with a spare cottage at Swinbrook near Burford which we used as our HQ for the first half.

Private waymarking is a little complex since whilst most county councils do not object to discreet extra signs on their posts, it is often quite difficult to decide which is a private post or which is CC. So in some instances one just has to take a gamble and face the possible wrath of a landowner. I thought that I might get up to ten such cases over the total distance but in fact have only received one vociferous complaint although I guess there have probably been a few signs removed. I have learnt from experience that one certainly does not consider any waymarking on large private estates such as Blenheim!

Involvement with the book took up a lot of my time last year and initial sales were quite good with a two pronged attack from publisher Nick Reardon and also my extra contacts. However it is quite surprising how all the necessary freebies to newspapers, magazines, journalists add up. The original 500 print run of my Ross Round book has just sold out after 7 years and I think that the 1500 run of The Palladian Way may take a similar time although my optimistic lady accountant now has me registered as a sole trader with some expenses tax (legitimately) deductable!

We keep getting little bits of free publicity for the walk and one of the more interesting items was provided by The Cotswold Conservation Trust who publish a walking newspaper called The Cotswold Lion which also acts as a sounding board for The Cotswold Wardens, who do so much good renovation and repair work on the footpaths within the Cotswold AONB. We were able to get them to put in a handrail down a steep slope and restore an old “Clapper” bridge on our route at Signet just south of Burford. This was funded by an associated charity called Friends of The Cotswolds and I provided a plaque to go on the parapet of the bridge so that apart from setting up a new long distance walk it was nice to be able to provide some small environmental improvement.

With Grandson at Restored Clapper Bridge at Signet

With Grandson at Restored Clapper Bridge at Signet

When I was with Ken Thomas last year we talked about meeting up and walking again- possibly in Wales, so we went up to Chester recently and I took Ken on an interesting backpacking trip which I had done previously some 8 or 9 years ago. This was a two day trip around and over the Arans which are in mid Wales and just to the south of Bala Lake. We left my car at Llanuwchylyn, which is at the western edge of the lake and traversed around the mountain (14m) to Dynas Mawddwy where we stayed at The Llew Coch or Red Lion, to us English folk. It wasn’t a very quiet evening, or night, since a local farmer had just sold a prize bull for £130K and was throwing a party for 130 friends and villagers in the large function room at the back of the pub. This was unfortunately almost below our bedroom and they were still enjoying themselves at 3.00am!
Our route the following morning was almost straight back over the ridge. I say almost, since Ken persuaded me to ascend on another permissary (in places) path which involved a very steep and stony climb but we were rewarded with an unusual bonus at the top in the shape of a most unusual Fox Trap which we were told about the previous night and which was fashioned like a sheep enclosure but with vertical sides, and in the past, a hen tethered in the middle to attract foxes. As we were looking for it, it dawned on me that it was April 1st and we had also just told a family of Germans walkers about it as well but “Thee of little faith”, there it was. It took another hour to get to the first summit Aran Fawddwy which is just 10m short of 3000 feet and then we continued on to the second summit of Aran Benethlyn which is a bit lower. The views were really great for about 50 miles in all directions and this mountain range is really quite quiet with maybe just 12 or so other walkers spotted over the whole weekend. We only walked about 12 miles but with 3400feet of ascent it took us nearly 8 hours and I found it quite a bit harder than on my last trip.

After all this, my next walking is going to be quite uneventful, and will be The Worcestershire Way with Wilts LDWA in May, which I have done twice before but not south to North so I should have some different views. I will let you know about it in due course but it could be another 18 months but I hope not!

The Palladian Way book launches

May 19, 2011 at 7:57 pm | Posted in Bath walks, Buckinghamshire walks, Gloucestershire walks, Oxfordshire walks, Wiltshire walks | 2 Comments
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I’m delighted to announce that The Palladian Way book is now available to buy.  To get your signed copy right now go to The Palladian Way page.

The Palladian Way book

The Palladian Way book

We have almost finished way marking the route so its ready to walk!

If you are interested here is a summary of the book from the media release.

The Palladian Way – Walk through Middle England’s Greatest Estates

Local walker Guy Vowles launches his third walking guide The Palladian Way.

The Palladian Way is a 125 mile walk through England’s finest Palladian estates in Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire, Wiltshire and Gloucestershire.

Palladian architecture, though often forgotten, is a popular classical style responsible for one of the world’s most famous buildings, The White House. Here in Middle England, we are lucky enough to have some of the finest examples of Palladian style. From the stature of Stowe House in Buckinghamshire to the intricacy of Prior Park near Bath you will be invigorated and inspired by this long distance walk through some of England’s finest countryside and estates.

Guy Vowles’ book, The Palladian Way, gives a step by step guide to this architectural trail, with coloured photos, illustrated maps and recommendations for eating, drinking and overnight stays. When of interest, Guy delves into local history and influential characters of the period such as the famous landscaper Capability Brown, The Mitford Girls and Flora Thomson, author of Lark Rise to Candleford.

The Palladian Way is now available for purchase at £9.99 through Guy Vowles’ walking website, https://guysrambles.co.uk/palladian-way/.

Walking Festivals

November 5, 2010 at 1:02 pm | Posted in Foodie walks, Pub walks, Wales walks, Walking festivals | Leave a comment
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Walking festivals have been around for quite a while but are now proliferating at such a rate that there is often one on many weeks of the year all over the country. They are also very useful as a “tool” for towns to promote themselves and increase footfall for tourists to the area. However, if you are a keen walker, and fancy a holiday in a different area with all the organization done for you, then they’re great.

The year before last, with my wife off skiing, I decided to hire a cottage in Crickhowell, which is one of my favourite  bases for walking in the Black Mountains. Whilst I was there I picked up a brochure for the Crickhowell Walking Festival which had just finished a week or two before and having studied the really interesting programme I made a note to take part this year.

Walking in the Black mountains

Walking in the Black mountains

Well, this year’s programme  had a total of 62 walks which were conveniently split up into different lengths and degrees of difficulty. I booked in for either 3 or 4 footprints which tended to be between 12 and 15 miles and often with up to 3000 feet of ascent. This makes the festival one of the most demanding ones but which suits me well. There was an added advantage as well in that if you are a member of The Brecon Beacons Park Society (£13 a year) there’s no charge (normally £5 for each walk) if you chose a walk led by one of the BBPS leaders.
The amazing thing about Crickhowell is that it appears to have it’s own micro climate. In 2009 I experienced just one hour of rain and in 2010- wait for it- ZILCH. That probably means that in 2011 it will probably rain the whole time! but I am still going for it again . Going back to this year. I was still not 100% with the knee and was rather worried on the first day trudging up Pen-yr- Gadair Fawr in several inches of snow but that was the worst and I got to meet a number of walkers who continued on the same walks as myself and which also introduced me to parts of the Black Mountains I hadn’t seen before.

Chartists Cave Black Mountains

Chartists Cave Black Mountains

I couldn’t get back into the same place I had in 2009 and ended up on a farm complex at Llangattock which is about a mile outside Crickhowell but not too far from one of my favourite pubs (more of a hotel) The Bear. I had a day off in the middle of the week and took myself off to Hay on Wye for some book hunting and then on the way back called in at the commodious Glyffaes Hotel which is off the A40 on the way to Brecon. The owner was leading several shorter walks for the festival and they do the most fantastic buffet tea which was part of my reason for calling!

There were also several social evening events including a talk by Don Brown  the famous climber. All in all, a great festival. I just hope that it doesn’t get too big or that the shorter walks take more priority. I was also joined by Cheltenham Rambling Club walkers Anne Ochala and Bea Therin who came over for several day walks.

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